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Saved from dogfighting, sweet dog starts to heal

CHICAGO – A bloody and battered dog found wandering the streets of Chicago has a lot to be thankful for this Thanksgiving.

Glinda the Beautiful, a dog who was treated at BluePearl Veterinary Partners after being rescued from organized dogfighting, with Marta Kenar, founder of MCP Rescue and Outreach.

Glinda the Beautiful, a dog who was treated at BluePearl Veterinary Partners after being rescued from organized dogfighting, with Marta Kenar, founder of MCP Rescue and Outreach.

Glinda the Beautiful, a 3-year-old pit bull terrier, is believed to be a victim of organized dogfighting. But thanks to MCP Rescue and Outreach and BluePearl Veterinary Partners, she’s now getting a chance for a better life.

“Dogfighting is just such a nasty, nasty reality,” said Marta Kenar, founder of MCP Rescue.

Glinda was found on Halloween, wandering as a stray in Roseland. A good Samaritan found the dog and managed to get her confined in a fenced-in yard, and then called police. Kenar’s group was brought in to help.

As soon as Kenar met Glinda, she could see the dog required immediate medical attention for her wounds. She also concluded by the number of wounds and their location – around her neck and the front of her chest – that she had been attacked by another dog during a dog fight.

She took Glinda to the BluePearl hospital in Northfield. BluePearl’s hospitals in Elk Grove Village, Northfield and Skokie are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, with veterinarians always on duty. Board-certified veterinary specialists work at each hospital.

“She had several bite wounds on her neck and chest with a pretty big laceration behind her ear,” said Dr. Will Fischbach, a senior clinician in emergency medicine at BluePearl.  “It’s so unfortunate that these things are still going on in our community.”

When the rescued dog was brought in to BluePearl, the first thing Fischbach noticed was, “She was just really dirty and bloody, head to toe.”  BluePearl staff worked to clean up Glinda and shaved the area around her wounds. Fischbach treated the largest wound, a three-inch gash, and placed two temporary drains beneath the skin of her chest, so that blood or other fluids could be removed without getting infected.

In spite of the multiple wounds, Fischbach said Glinda’s prognosis is excellent. “I think it just shows the resilience of our four-legged creatures,” Fischbach said. He also praised the rescue group for its work to help Glinda.

In addition to Glinda’s wounds, there was something else that caught the attention of both Fischbach and Kenar — her sweetness.

“She was willing to give you a kiss in the face just by way of introduction,” Fischbach said.

“Glinda definitely needs a forever home,” Kenar said. “She is a phenomenal dog in every sense. She is gentle on the leash, she is nothing but love to everyone who meets her.”